“You Were Born with a Giant Silver Spoon in Your Mouth”: Geography, the Young, and Social Class in Finnish Films in the 2000s

  • Tommi Römpötti
Keywords: Finnish film, class, geography, neo-liberalism, gender

Abstract

In several Finnish films of the 2000s, Finland is portrayed as divided geographically into two parts: the small urban area around Finland’s capital, Helsinki, in the south and the rural areas in the country’s north. This polarization frames conceptualizations of social class, particularly in films that depict young people leaving their homes. Forbidden Fruit (Kielletty hedelmä) and August (Elokuu) are examples of Finnish cinema in the 2000s that negotiate ideas about class and circulate this polarized imagination through geography. Both films depict the young leaving their homes and then clashing with a geographically marked border. The films are analyzed in the context of the neo-liberal success story which defines the ideal subject of contemporary society. The article argues that the cinematic journeys of the young show the power of geography in reproducing class structures.

Author Biography

Tommi Römpötti

Tommi Römpötti, Ph.D., is a film researcher currently working on the project “Movie Making Finland: Finnish Fiction Films as Audiovisual Big Data, 1907-2017” in cultural history at University of Turku. He has published on Finnish youth films and road movies from various perspectives, such as history, narration, spectacle, gender, and class.

Published
2020-12-10
How to Cite
Römpötti, T. (2020). “You Were Born with a Giant Silver Spoon in Your Mouth”: Geography, the Young, and Social Class in Finnish Films in the 2000s. Jeunesse: Young People, Texts, Cultures, 12(2), 62-85. Retrieved from https://jeunessejournal.ca/index.php/yptc/article/view/550
Section
Articles