“Where Happily Ever After Happens Every Day”: Disney’s Official Princess Website and the Commodification of Play

  • Meghan M. Sweeney
Keywords: Disney, princesses, websites, commodification

Abstract

This article interrogates Disney’s web presence as manifested in its official Princess website, http://disney.go.com/princess, arguing that this new media platform is one way that Disney commodifies play. While the site is only one part of a complex web of texts that forms Disney Princess, it serves a crucial cultural function. As a legitimate Disney site, it has an aura of authenticity; as a site with a dual implied audience of young children and their parents, it is a key way to shape consumers and track online habits. This article argues that despite a persistent emphasis on individual choice, this site works to control and regulate play, substituting Disney-inflected notions of “specialness” for actual user agency.

 

 

Author Biography

Meghan M. Sweeney

Meghan M. Sweeney is an Associate Professor at the University of North Carolina Wilmington, where she teaches courses in children’s and young adult literature. Her publications include articles in Children’s Literature Association Quarterly, Children’s Literature in Education, and ALAN Review. She is currently working on a book-length critical examination of wedding culture in children’s texts.

Published
2011-10-04
How to Cite
Sweeney, M. (2011). “Where Happily Ever After Happens Every Day”: Disney’s Official Princess Website and the Commodification of Play. Jeunesse: Young People, Texts, Cultures, 3(2). Retrieved from http://jeunessejournal.ca/index.php/yptc/article/view/94
Section
Articles