Breaking Faith: Disrupted Expectations and Ownership in Stephenie Meyer’s Twilight Saga

  • Rachel Hendershot Parkin
Keywords: Twilight, Stephenie Meyer, faith, ownership

Abstract

My paper suggests that the Twilight saga’s enormous popularity is closely tied to its author’s tension-filled relationship with her fans, who claim ownership of her text by forcing their own interpretations through online media.  The result is that through engaging with her fans, Stephenie Meyer actually empowers the Twilight fandom and alters the role readers play in the tri-part relationship of reader, author, and text.  Fan studies and reception theory help me to effectively examine this dynamic by considering interpretations of what is “canon,” representations of women, and the creation of new Twilight books. 

Author Biography

Rachel Hendershot Parkin

Rachel Hendershot Parkin graduated from Kansas State University with a B.A. in English and Women’s Studies in 2005, and subsequently worked as a Youth Information Specialist at a busy public library in Overland Park, Kansas. She earned her M.A. in Children’s Literature from Kansas State University in 2009, where her research interests included folktales, fantasy literature, and fan studies. She is currently working on her J.D. degree at the University of Montana School of Law.

Published
2010-10-21
How to Cite
Parkin, R. (2010). Breaking Faith: Disrupted Expectations and Ownership in Stephenie Meyer’s Twilight Saga. Jeunesse: Young People, Texts, Cultures, 2(2). Retrieved from http://jeunessejournal.ca/index.php/yptc/article/view/50
Section
Articles