Girl-Animal Metamorphoses: Voice, Choice, and (Material) Agency of the Transforming Female Body in Young Adult Literature

  • Tharini Viswanath
Keywords: embodiment, girl-animal metamorphosis, language, lying, material agency, silencing, voice, YA fiction

Abstract

This article draws on theories of material feminism and children’s literature scholarship to examine the relationship between the metamorphing adolescent body and language in two texts that deal with girl-animal metamorphoses: Justine Larbalestier’s Liar and Peter Dickinson’s Eva. In particular, it examines how the materiality of the characters’ transforming bodies gives them agency when they are silenced on the level of the human, and more important, how the liminality of the metamorph’s body influences their access to human language, which in turn enables them to survive in their respective societies.

Author Biography

Tharini Viswanath

Tharini Viswanath is a Ph.D. candidate in English studies at Illinois State University, with a specialization in children’s literature. Her research on feminine agency in adolescent and young adult literature with regard to voice, materiality, and female friendships has appeared in the journal Papers: Explorations into Children’s Literature

Published
2019-08-15
How to Cite
Viswanath, T. (2019). Girl-Animal Metamorphoses: Voice, Choice, and (Material) Agency of the Transforming Female Body in Young Adult Literature. Jeunesse: Young People, Texts, Cultures, 11(1), 112-138. Retrieved from http://jeunessejournal.ca/index.php/yptc/article/view/433
Section
Articles