“International Friendliness” and Canadian Identities: Transnational Tensions in Canadian Junior Red Cross Texts, 1919-1939

  • Sarah Glassford
Keywords: Red Cross, citizenship, children, youth, humanitarianism, internationalism

Abstract

As the youth wing of the Canadian Red Cross Society, the Junior Red Cross (JRC) program of the 1920s and 1930s aimed to teach school-aged children and youth habits of good health, good citizenship, and service to others. Inspired by a transnational ethic of humanitarianism, the program tried to build international ties of friendship between JRC members in Canada and those elsewhere, while shaping Canadian Juniors in a particular mould of national citizenship. Through an examination of adult and child contributions to the national JRC magazine, and the portfolios Juniors created to send overseas, this article explores the tensions inherent in the national and transnational lessons conveyed by adult JRC leaders as well as the ways young Canadians embraced, modified, or rejected those perspectives.

Author Biography

Sarah Glassford

Sarah Glassford holds a Ph.D. in Canadian History (York University) and a Master of Library and Information Science (Western University), combining the two disciplines in her professional life as an archivist and historian. She is the author of Mobilizing Mercy: A History of the Canadian Red Cross (MQUP, 2017), and co-editor of A Sisterhood of Suffering and Service: Women and Girls of Canada and Newfoundland during the First World War (UBC P, 2012).

Published
2019-01-07
How to Cite
Glassford, S. (2019). “International Friendliness” and Canadian Identities: Transnational Tensions in Canadian Junior Red Cross Texts, 1919-1939. Jeunesse: Young People, Texts, Cultures, 10(2), 52-72. Retrieved from http://jeunessejournal.ca/index.php/yptc/article/view/429
Section
Articles on Canadian Youth and Culture in Transnational Perspective