“Because That’s What We Do . . . We Sit and We Drink and We Talk”: Stories and Storytelling among Street-Involved Youth

  • Lisa Mitchell
  • Marion Selfridge

Abstract

Eliciting stories of homelessness, past trauma, addiction, and street resilience is regarded widely as useful for understanding the problems youth face and enabling solutions. Young people’s stories of homelessness, past trauma, addiction, and street resilience can help illuminate the problems they face and identify possible solutions. Recent scholarship has conceptualized youth narratives in diverse ways, but how do young people view their stories and their telling? Drawing on our work in western Canada, we explore how a group of street-involved youth view stories as personal and collective memories, as strategies for negotiating the complex circumstances of their lives, and as especially powerful forms of recognition. 

Author Biographies

Lisa Mitchell

Lisa M. Mitchell is Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Victoria.  Her research focuses on bodies, especially in the context of health and illness, reproduction, children and youth, and poverty. She has worked collaboratively with children and youth in Canada and in the Philippines.

Marion Selfridge

Marion Selfridge, M.S.W., is a Ph.D. candidate in Social Dimensions of Health at the University of Victoria and teaches dance to stay sane. Her dissertation research focuses on street-involved youth’s use of social media to deal with grief and loss.

Published
2018-09-13
How to Cite
Mitchell, L., & Selfridge, M. (2018). “Because That’s What We Do . . . We Sit and We Drink and We Talk”: Stories and Storytelling among Street-Involved Youth. Jeunesse: Young People, Texts, Cultures, 9(2). Retrieved from http://jeunessejournal.ca/index.php/yptc/article/view/390
Section
Articles