Cultural Preservation and Metropolitan Transformation: Folk-Tale Traditions and <em>The Queen of Paradise’s Garden</em>, a Newfoundland Jack Tale

  • Teya Rosenberg
Keywords: Newfoundland, culture and history, folktales, puppetry, picturebooks

Abstract

The Queen of Paradise’s Garden, adapted by Andy Jones and illustrated by Darka Erdelji, is a picture-book version of a Newfoundland Jack tale. The movement of the tale through a variety of forms—from oral tale to print transcription to puppet play to picture book—and its role as a cultural artifact echo the complexities of folk-tale transmission and transformation globally and historically. This article examines the ways in which the picture book and its antecedent versions are both of Newfoundland and of a larger and ongoing history of folk tales.

Author Biography

Teya Rosenberg

Teya Rosenberg has degrees in English from Memorial University of Newfoundland and Labrador, Carleton University (Ottawa), and the University of Alberta. She is an Associate Professor of English at Texas State University in San Marcos, where she teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in children’s literature, magical realism and fantasy, critical theory, and Canadian literature. Her publications include Diana Wynne Jones: An Exciting and Exacting Wisdom, Considering Children’s Literature: A Reader, and articles on Lobel’s Frog and Toad books, E. Nesbit’s Psammead trilogy, and magical realism in children’s literature.

Published
2013-12-02
How to Cite
Rosenberg, T. (2013). Cultural Preservation and Metropolitan Transformation: Folk-Tale Traditions and <em>The Queen of Paradise’s Garden</em&gt;, a Newfoundland Jack Tale. Jeunesse: Young People, Texts, Cultures, 5(2). Retrieved from http://jeunessejournal.ca/index.php/yptc/article/view/196
Section
Articles