Do Something! Disciplinary Spaces and the Ideological Work of Play in James De Mille’s <em>The “B. O. W. C.”</em> and Richard Scrimger’s <em>Into the Ravine</em>

  • Cheryl Cowdy
Keywords: Canadian children's literature, suburbs in literature

Abstract

This analysis of a recent example of a Canadian adventure novel, Richard Scrimger’s Into the Ravine, is informed by a comparison to a nineteenth-century adventure novel, James De Mille’s The “B. O. W. C.”: A Book for Boys. I examine the development of the relationship between wilderness and domestic spaces and the ideological imperatives of the genre. As the locus of adventure moves from “real” wilderness spaces to the domesticated spaces of ravine and suburb, I suggest that play replaces survival as the ideological subtexts of young adult fiction. For the boys of contemporary Canadian adventure novels, the ravine becomes a complex moral geography shaped by the reactionary panic of modern adults.

Author Biography

Cheryl Cowdy

Cheryl Cowdy is an Assistant Professor of Children’s Studies in the Department of Humanities at York University. Her current research explores the relationship between cultural change and reading practices in multimedia and transmedia texts. She has published most recently in Bookbird and in Global Studies of Childhood.

Published
2013-05-27
How to Cite
Cowdy, C. (2013). Do Something! Disciplinary Spaces and the Ideological Work of Play in James De Mille’s <em>The “B. O. W. C.”</em> and Richard Scrimger’s <em>Into the Ravine</em&gt;. Jeunesse: Young People, Texts, Cultures, 5(1). Retrieved from http://jeunessejournal.ca/index.php/yptc/article/view/119
Section
Articles