CFP - Laughter / Le rire

2020-05-22

Abstracts due July 1, 2020. Final papers due October 1, 2020

Jeunesse: Young People, Texts, Cultures invites abstracts in English or French on all matters pertaining to laughter in relation to young people’s texts and cultures for a special issue that will be published in Summer 2021.

While the very idea of laughter may appear inappropriate during a pandemic, the high number of internet memes devoted to laughing at it indicates that it has proved to be therapeutic for many. No matter how difficult the times, laughter is something many people do from their earliest days and across their entire lifetimes, and while it may at first glance appear to be merely an innocent expression of amusement, it is actually a far more complex articulation. A laugh can be sudden, ambiguous, unexpected, or even sinister. It can be an involuntary burst of emotion, or it may be strategic, derisive and dismissive. When shared, laughter can foster community and at the same time distinguish between those who belong and those who do not since a laugh out of place can be perceived as a failure to interpret cultural codes. Comedic conventions can shift over time and are in large part culturally determined, but the laugh itself is a remarkably universal form of expression despite its many forms and diverse contexts. At once a ubiquitous nonverbal vocalization expressing joy or mirth (Bryant et. al. 1516) and a “multifaceted social signal” that can surpass social bonding to “also serve as a social rejection cue” (Ethofer 353), laughter has posed a significant challenge to researchers in the sciences, social sciences, and the humanities.1 At the same time, as Bakhtin notes in his introduction to Rabelais and his World, “[l]aughter and its forms represent [...] the least scrutinized sphere of the people’s creation” (4). Notwithstanding a large body of research and philosophy on laughter, there is still so much we do not know about it. Its importance is nevertheless underlined by the human tendency to create laughter in response to the world, and to evoke and inspire it across numerous forms and genres as well as in everyday cultural practice. It is doubtless an integral register in entertainment, which, as Richard Dyer points out, "offers the image of 'something better' to escape into, or something we want deeply that our day-to-day lives don’t provide. Alternatives, hopes, wishes—these are the stuff of utopia, the sense that things could be better, that something other than what is can be imagined and maybe realized." (20)

There is no doubt that laughter plays an important role in young people’s texts and cultures, and one that differs considerably from the role it plays among adults, although appeals to a dual audience mean that both adults and children can enjoy a laugh or two in response to children’s media (Butler 40). In picture books, an unruly gross-out toilet-humor aesthetic can provoke riotous laughter in children, whose tastes and limited knowledge invite unique engagements with the bawdy. One could argue that the bawdy tends to draw a different kind of laughter from children than adults, making research on children’s laughter an important and necessary supplement to research on humour and comedy in children’s literature.2 This focus may be especially important for children in early childhood education, since, as Laura Tallant points out, researchers have tended to privilege the role that humour plays among school-aged children (252). Significantly, laughter can also function as an interactional resource. Understanding how it does so among young people is, however, not well understood, since extant research disproportionately focuses on adults. In his own attempt to redress this gap, Gareth Walker argues that it is as important for children “to figure out how to use laughter [...] in a reflexively accountable way” as it is for adults (20).

The darker side of laughter emerges in young people’s texts and cultures as well, notably in the context of bullying where it functions as a means of articulating power and control. Representations of laughter do not always function as “feel good” forms of escapism, but rather, can be triggering for young readers who often find themselves at the receiving end of hostile laughter. Testifying to the psychic effects of malicious laughter, the fear of laughter—called “gelotophobia”—is an object of study in psychiatric research.3 Laughing, or being the one laughed at, can determine social position among children the same way it does among adults. The social function of laughter remains a key site of critical inquiry for researchers who study youth culture, indicating that social-science research is as important as literary or cultural studies research in making sense of laughter as a complex, multivalent, dynamic and powerful expression among young people.4

In an attempt to redress some of the gaps in research on laughter in studies of young people’s texts and cultures, we invite articles that offer critical engagements with laughter for a special issue on the topic. Social scientific engagements as well as those using an historical studies, literary studies, theatre studies, media studies, or cultural studies approach are welcome.

Topics may include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Laughter and community: inclusion and isolation
  • Satire/parody in children’s media; dual audiences
  • Bodily, bawdy and carnivalesque humour
  • Derisive laughter; cruel laughter; mockery; gelatophobia
  • Laughter as a social reward, social soother, and/or social enforcer
  • Laughter as expression; laughter and affect
  • Laughter across cultures
  • Laughter and sex/gender; sexual orientation; queer texts, identities, and cultures
  • Sublimation, laughter/tears and awkward laughter
  • Comedy, Slapstick, Horror: laughter and genre
  • Catharsis and annihilation
  • Laughter as interactional resource
  • Laughter as contagious
  • Laughter and optimism/pessimism
  • Clowns and Laughter
  • Funny Kid Memes and the Adult Gaze
  • Comics and the “Funnies”
  • Laughter in story, film, TV, video games, vlogs, and other media designed for or created and/or consumed by young people

Timeline

  • Abstracts, written either in English or French, are due July 1, 2020
  • Short-listed papers will be notified on or around July 15, 2020
  • Final papers due October 1, 2020
  • Peer-review: October 2020-January 2021
  • Revisions: January-April 2021
  • Publication: Summer 2021

All articles will be double-blind peer-reviewed and may be written in English or French. They should be approximately 7000 words long.

Inquiries

  • Lauren Bosc, Managing Editor: l.bosc@uwinnipeg.ca

Further information about submission guidelines is available at: http://jeunessejournal.ca/index.php/yptc/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions

 

Notes

[1] Adrienne Wood and Paula Niedenthal go further to argue that “laughter can function as a social reward that reinforces the behaviour of the recipient as a social soother that conveys nonthreat and affiliation, and as a social enforcer that asserts dominance or superiority” (2).

[2] In a study of uses of scatalogical humour in children’s picture books, John McKenzie points out that “the bawdy is part of the underground world of children” (82).

[3] See, for example, Ilona Papousek et al.’s study, which indicates that “the fear of other person’s laughter is associated with a functional configuration of the brain that leaves affected people less protected against social signals of anger and aggression” (66).

[4] See Hackley et al.’s study of how laughter functions socially among young people in the UK.

 

Works Cited

Bakhtin, Mikhail. Rabelais and his World. 1965. Trans. Hélène Iswolsky. Indiana University Press, 1984.

Bryant, Gregory, et al. “The Perception of Spontaneous and Volitional Laughter across 21 Societies.” Psychological Science, vol. 29, no. 9, 2018, pp. 1515-25.

Butler, Francelia. “Children’s Literature: The Bad Seed.” Signposts to Criticism of Children’s Literature, edited by Robert Bator, American Library Association, 1983, pp. 37-49.

Dyer, Richard. Only Entertainment. Routledge, 2002.

Ethofer, Thomas, et al. “Are You Laughing at Me? Neural Correlates of Social Intent Attribution to Auditory and Visual Laughter.” Hum Brain Mapp, vol. 41, 2020, pp. 353-61.

Hackley, Chris, et al. “Young Adults and ‘Binge’ Drinking: A Bakhtinian Analysis.” Journal of Marketing Management, vol. 29, no. 7-8, 2013, pp. 933-49.

McKenzie. “Bums, Poos and Wees: Carnivalesque Spaces in the Picture Books of Early Childhood. Or, Has Literature Gone to the Dogs?” English Teaching: Practice and Critique, vol. 4, no. 1, 2005, pp. 81-94.

Papousek, Ilona, et al. “The Fear of Other Person’s Laughter: Poor Neuronal Protection against Social Signals of Anger and Aggression.” Psychiatry Research, vol. 235, 2016, pp. 61-8.

Tallant, Laura. “Framing Young Children’s Humour and Practitioner Responses to it Using a Bakhtinian Carnivalesque Lens.” International Journal of Early Childhood, vol. 47, no. 2, 2015, pp. 251-66.

Walker, Gareth. “Young Children’s Use of Laughter as a Means of Responding to Questions.” Journal of Pragmatics, vol. 112, 2017, pp. 20-32.

Wood, Adrienne, and Paula Niedenthal. “Developing a Social Functional Account of Laughter.” Personal Psychol Compass, vol. 12, 2018, pp. 1-14.

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

Jeunesse : Young People, Texts, Cultures vous invite à soumettre un résumé en français ou en anglais sur le rire en relation avec les textes et la culture des jeunes pour un numéro spécial qui sera publié à l’été 2021.

Bien que l’idée même du rire puisse sembler inappropriée lors d’une pandémie, le nombre élevé de mèmes se moquant de la pandémie sur Internet indique que le rire s’est avéré thérapeutique pour plusieurs d’entre nous. Peu importe les difficultés vécues, le rire fait partie de la vie de beaucoup de gens dès l’enfance et tout au long de leur vie. Alors qu’à première vue, il peut sembler être simplement une expression innocente de l’amusement, le rire est en fait une forme d’expression beaucoup plus complexe. Un rire peut être soudain, ambigu, inattendu voire sinistre. Il peut s’agir d’un sursaut involontaire d’émotion ou il peut être stratégique, dérisoire et dédaigneux. Lorsqu’il est partagé, le rire peut favoriser le sentiment d’appartenance à la communauté tout en créant une distinction entre ceux qui y appartiennent et ceux qui n’y appartiennent pas. En effet, un rire déplacé peut être perçu comme une mauvaise interprétation des codes culturels. De plus, ce qui est considéré comique peut changer au fil du temps et est en grande partie déterminé culturellement, même si le rire lui-même est une forme d’expression remarquablement universelle malgré ses nombreuses formes et ses contextes divers. Étant à la fois une vocalisation omniprésente et non verbale exprimant la joie ou la gaieté (Bryant et coll. 1516) ainsi qu’un “multifaceted social signal” qui peut aussi servir de signal de rejet social (Ethofer 353), le rire a posé un défi important aux chercheurs en sciences, sciences sociales et humaines.1 Comme Bakhtine le note dans son introduction à Rabelais and his World, “[l]aughter and its forms represent [...] the least scrutinized sphere of the people’s creation” (4). En dépit du grand nombre de recherches et de réflexions philosophiques sur le rire, il semble que nous avons encore beaucoup à apprendre à ce sujet. Son importance est mise de l’avant par la tendance humaine à vouloir produire des rires en réponse au monde, à l’évoquer et à s’en inspirer sous toutes ses formes et genres, ainsi que dans la pratique culturelle quotidienne. Il s’agit sans doute d’un registre intégral de divertissement qui, comme le souligne Richard Dyer "offers the image of 'something better' to escape into, or something we want deeply that our day-to-day lives don’t provide. Alternatives, hopes, wishes—these are the stuff of utopia, the sense that things could be better, that something other than what is can be imagined and maybe realized" (20).

Il ne fait aucun doute que le rire joue un rôle important dans les textes et cultures des jeunes, un rôle qui diffère considérablement de celui qu’il joue chez les adultes, bien qu’autant les adultes que les enfants peuvent rigoler en réponse aux médias pour enfants puisque ceux-ci s’adressent souvent à un double public (Butler 40). Dans les albums jeunesse, une esthétique scatologique indisciplinée et dégoutante peut provoquer des rires hystériques chez les enfants, dont les goûts et les connaissances limitées invitent à des engagements uniques avec le grivois. On pourrait affirmer que l’humour grivois tend à attirer un type de rire différent des enfants que des adultes, faisant de la recherche sur le rire des enfants un complément important et nécessaire à la recherche sur l’humour et la comédie dans la littérature jeunesse.2 Cette orientation peut être particulièrement importante en éducation à la petite enfance puisque, comme le souligne Laura Tallant, les chercheurs ont eu tendance à privilégier le rôle que joue l’humour chez les enfants d’âge scolaire (252). De plus, le rire peut fonctionner comme ressource interactionnelle. La recherche existante se concentre cependant de façon disproportionnée sur les adultes et le rire comme ressource interactionnelle chez les jeunes n’est pas bien compris. Gareth Walker soutient qu’il serait aussi important pour les enfants que pour les adultes de comprendre comment utiliser le rire d’une manière réflexivement responsable (20).

Le côté sombre du rire émerge aussi dans les textes et les cultures des jeunes, notamment dans le contexte de l’intimidation où il fonctionne comme un moyen d’articuler le pouvoir et le contrôle. Les représentations du rire ne servent pas toujours à s’évader, mais peuvent agir comme un déclencheur pour les jeunes lecteurs qui ont été victimes de rires hostiles. Témoignant des effets psychiques du rire malveillant, la peur du rire, appelée« gélotophobie », est un objet d’étude en recherche psychiatrique.3 Rire, ou être celui dont on se moque, peut déterminer la position sociale chez les enfants de la même façon qu’elle le fait chez les adultes. La fonction sociale du rire demeure un site clé de recherche critique pour les chercheurs qui étudient la culture des jeunes. La recherche en sciences sociales est donc aussi importante que la recherche en études littéraires ou culturelles afin de donner un sens au rire comme expression complexe, polyvalente, dynamique et puissante chez les jeunes.4

Afin de tenter de pallier certaines des lacunes dans la recherche sur le rire, nous invitons des articles qui offrent des analyses critiques du rire dans les textes et les cultures des jeunes pour un numéro spécial sur le sujet. Les analyses sociales ainsi que celles qui utilisent des approches historiques, littéraires, théâtrales, médiatiques ou culturelles sont les bienvenues.

Les articles peuvent aborder les sujets suivants, mais ne sont pas limités à ce qui suit :

  • Le rire et l’appartenance à la communauté : inclusion et isolement
  • La satire/parodie dans les médias pour enfants ; double public
  • L’humour corporel, grivois et carnavalesque
  • Le rire dérisoire ; le rire cruel ; la moquerie ; la gélotophobie
  • Le rire en tant que récompense, apaisant et/ou exécutant social
  • Le rire comme expression ; le rire et l’affect
  • Le rire à travers les cultures
  • Le rire et le sexe/genre ; l’orientation sexuelle ; les textes queer, les identités et les cultures
  • La sublimation, le rire/ les larmes et le rire qui gêne
  • La comédie, la comédie déjantée, l’horreur : le rire et les genres littéraires
  • La catharsis et l’annihilation
  • Le rire en tant que ressource interactionnelle
  • Le rire et la contagion
  • Le rire et l’optimisme/pessimisme
  • Les clowns et rire
  • Les mèmes amusants représentant des enfants et le regard adulte
  • Les bandes dessinées
  • Le rire dans les histoires, les films, la télévision, les jeux vidéo, les vlogs et autres médias conçus pour les jeunes ou créés et/ou consommés par eux

Calendrier

  • Date de remise des résumés, rédigés en français ou en anglais: 1er juillet 2020
  • Les auteurs des résumés sélectionnés seront avertis vers le 15 juillet 2020
  • Date de remise des manuscrits finaux : 1er octobre 2020
  • Évaluations par les pairs : octobre 2020 à janvier 2021
  • Révision des manuscrits par les auteur.e.s en fonction des commentaires des évaluateur.trice.s: janvier à avril 2021
  • Publication : été 2021

Tous les articles seront soumis à un processus d’évaluation en double aveugle par les pairs et pourront être rédigés en anglais ou en français. Ils doivent compter environ 7000 mots.

Questions

De plus amples renseignements sur les lignes directrices en matière de soumission sont disponibles à : http://jeunessejournal.ca/index.php/yptc/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions

 

Remarques

[1] Adrienne Wood et Paula Niedenthal vont plus loin pour faire valoir que « laughter can function as a social reward that reinforces the behaviour of the recipient as a social soother that conveys nonthreat and affiliation, and as a social enforcer that asserts dominance or superiority » (2).

[2] Dans une étude sur l’utilisation de l’humour scatologique dans les albums jeunesse, John McKenzie souligne que « the bawdy is part of the underground world of children » (82).

[3] Voir, par exemple, l’étude d’Ilona Papousek et coll. qui indique que « the fear of other person’s laughter is associated with a functional configuration of the brain that leaves affected people less protected against social signals of anger and aggression » (66).

[4] Voir l’étude de Hackley et coll. sur la façon dont le rire fonctionne socialement chez les jeunes au Royaume-Uni.

  

Références bibliographiques

Bakhtin, Mikhail. Rabelais and his World. 1965. Trans. Hélène Iswolsky. Indiana University Press, 1984.

Bryant, Gregory, et al. “The Perception of Spontaneous and Volitional Laughter across 21 Societies.” Psychological Science, vol. 29, no. 9, 2018, pp. 1515-25.

Butler, Francelia. “Children’s Literature: The Bad Seed.” Signposts to Criticism of Children’s Literature, edited by Robert Bator, American Library Association, 1983, pp. 37-49.

Dyer, Richard. Only Entertainment. Routledge, 2002.

Ethofer, Thomas, et al. “Are You Laughing at Me? Neural Correlates of Social Intent Attribution to Auditory and Visual Laughter.” Hum Brain Mapp, vol. 41, 2020, pp. 353-61.

Hackley, Chris, et al. “Young Adults and ‘Binge’ Drinking: A Bakhtinian Analysis.” Journal of Marketing Management, vol. 29, no. 7-8, 2013, pp. 933-49.

McKenzie. “Bums, Poos and Wees: Carnivalesque Spaces in the Picture Books of Early Childhood. Or, Has Literature Gone to the Dogs?” English Teaching: Practice and Critique, vol. 4, no. 1, 2005, pp. 81-94.

Papousek, Ilona, et al. “The Fear of Other Person’s Laughter: Poor Neuronal Protection against Social Signals of Anger and Aggression.” Psychiatry Research, vol. 235, 2016, pp. 61-8.

Tallant, Laura. “Framing Young Children’s Humour and Practitioner Responses to it Using a Bakhtinian Carnivalesque Lens.” International Journal of Early Childhood, vol. 47, no. 2, 2015, pp. 251-66.

Walker, Gareth. “Young Children’s Use of Laughter as a Means of Responding to Questions.” Journal of Pragmatics, vol. 112, 2017, pp. 20-32.

Wood, Adrienne, and Paula Niedenthal. “Developing a Social Functional Account of Laughter.” Personal Psychol Compass, vol. 12, 2018, pp. 1-14.